Removing a Wisdom Tooth

Removing a wisdom tooth is pretty scary. It is a routine treatment for dentists and oral surgeons, but it can be frightening for the patient. Family and friends may have told you stories about a painful procedure, not being able to eat, and being sick or inflamed. Everyone knows someone who has had such a treatment, but far more often everything goes well. To help you feel prepared, we will talk through the operation.

Step One – The Dentist
The dentist can often pull the upper wisdom teeth. This is nice because it doesn’t require a visit to the hospital. Also, dentists often have shorter waiting times and are more flexible than a dental surgeon. However, the lower wisdom teeth often cause problems. The dental surgeon usually removes these. The dental surgeon is further specialized and has other and more resources ready to remove the molars well. If you are sent to the dental surgeon for a (lower) wisdom tooth, then there is nothing wrong. Often it is just a standard procedure; the tooth can quickly come out.

Step Two – How many?
Usually, only one wisdom tooth is removed at the same time. Especially when there is no hurry, this is a better option. After pulling it is difficult to eat for some time, and the wound must be kept clean. Also, the other complaints will become worse. If multiple wisdom teeth are removed at the same time, there is usually a good reason for this. Think of decaying molars or huge ones that grow in the wrong direction. Sometimes several teeth are drawn simultaneously because it is more convenient.

Step Three – Photos Taken
Often, an X-ray is taken just before the tooth is pulled. This is to see how the tooth lies and whether there is a risk of hitting nerves. For the photo, you only have to sit still. The dentist or dental surgeon looks at the picture and determines how the tooth can best come out.

After the dentist or dental surgeon has looked at the photo and knows what has to happen, he will discuss it with you. Pay attention, the treatment may differ. From the moment the procedure starts until the moment you can leave the chair, it takes about 15 minutes, if everything goes well. However, it can also last closer to half an hour.

Step Four – The Sedation
Before the real treatment happens you are – fortunately – numb. In some cases, a general anesthetic is needed, but a local anesthetic is almost always sufficient. There are three needles in the corner where the tooth is stuck (one by one). These hurt for a moment, but this makes the rest of the treatment painless. Once the procedure begins, the dentist or dental surgeon will ask if it hurts. Be honest about this, if you feel anything more than pressure. In most cases, you will probably no longer feel anything.

Step Five – The Real Treatment
This is the part of the treatment that most people are afraid of. Your dentist will remove the wisdom tooth, and you will feel pressure on your jaw. Do you not feel comfortable? Make sure to communicate any discomfort to your doctor, we are here to help!

Soon the dentist or dental surgeon will say that you are done. You can sit upright again, and you get gauze to bite, to stifle the blood.

Step Six – Take Some Time
It is not always wise to go home immediately after the treatment. Even if you have been placed under general anesthesia, you should stay or lie down until you are fit enough. Once you have reached that stage, it is best to make sure that someone comes to pick you up. You may not feel well, or be thinking clearly. After removing the wisdom tooth, you should in any case not drive home by car.

Step Seven – Recovery
At home, it is essential to keep the place clean, to take painkillers and to take sufficient rest. Start with a sedative before the pain begins, Paracetamol and ibuprofen are suitable for this. Then cool the jaw to prevent swelling.

Finally
Removing a wisdom tooth can be annoying, but not a disaster. Many people are afraid of it, but this is not necessary. After a short time, the treatment is over, and although the pain can last for a few days, it is not as bad as constant inflammations due to poor cleaning, or the illness because the tooth grows the wrong way.

Bad Dental Habits That you Should Avoid

When it comes to having a healthy and beautiful smile, patients in and around the greater Denver area can count on the team at University Dental Arts. We offer comprehensive general dentistry services, including tips and basic do’s and don’ts for lastng dental wellness.

With that in mind, let’s look at some common bad dental habits that you have to avoid if you want to have healthy teeth and gums.

Not Brushing Your Teeth Enough

People really should brush their teeth at least twice a day, but you might be surprised how infrequently some people brush. To have the best dental health possible, consider brushing after every meal.

Not Flossing Your Teeth Enough

Flossing should be done once a night, but most times people can’t even manage that, which is unfortunate since food particles and plaque get trapped between teeth. Ideally you should consider flossing after every meal.

Brushing and Flossing Too Aggressively

Sometimes people brush and floss enough, but they do it too aggressively. This can harm the gum tissue and make gum recession more likely. Be gentle when brushing and flossing, and be sure to use a soft-bristled toothbrush.

Using Tobacco Products

Smoking and using chewing tobacco are bad habits in and of themselves that cause many health issues, including cancer, heart disease, and lung disease. Tobacco can also lead to bad breath and tooth discoloration. These are just other reasons to finally quit for good.

Biting and Nibbling Inedible Items

Sometimes as a nervous habit, people may bite their nails, chew on pen caps, nibble on straws, or chomp down on ice cubes. All of these can potentially weaken teeth and cause chips and cracks to occur. Consider avoiding these kinds of actions.

Using Your Teeth Like a Pair of Scissors

Sometimes when a bag or some packaging is difficult to open, people use their teeth to open it rather than scissors. This can result in serious damage to the teeth. When you need scissors, just grab scissors.

Not Wearing Mouth or Face Protection

If you play contact sports or participate in combat sports, potential injury to the head and face is a risk you take. To avoid serious injuries to the mouth and your face, wear proper mouth guards and protective gear.

Snacking on Sugary Foods

Junk food really can rot your teeth out since the oral bacteria in the mouth loves sugar and carbs. Think of healthier options for snacks if you’re feeling hungry.

Drinking Too Much Soda

Soda and other kinds off carbonated beverages can lead to changes in the pH of your mouth, weakening the enamel of your teeth. Go easy on the soda so your teeth can stay healthy for years and years.

Not Staying Hydrated

Dry mouth is sometimes caused by not being hydrated properly. Drink water throughout the day to hydrate. It will keep your mouth moist, remove food particles between teeth, and help control bad breath to a certain degree.

Not Visiting Your Dentist Regularly

Twice a year may not seem like too much, but meeting with you dentist can make a world of difference for preventative care and more advanced treatments. Be sure to meet with your dentist today if you haven’t in a while.

Schedule a Consultation at University Dental Arts

If you would like more information about good dental health habits and how you can improve the quality of your smile, bee sure to contact our cosmetic and restorative dentistry center today. The entire team at University Dental Arts will work with you to address all of your concerns.